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Paddleworms and Trowels

Teresa Darbyshire, 26 Ionawr 2015

24.01.15

Today was packed full. Brendan managed to get a dive in before we had to head down to Walker Creek for an afternoon tide. The shore dive went from near Gypsy Cove, not far out of Stanley and involved a short off-road drive to the shore before the divers had to pick their way down across the rocks to get into the water (photo 1). Apparently visibility was reasonable at around 6m and Brendan’s present to me this time consisted of a bag of sand and a couple of bags of ‘stuff’ scraped off the rocks. Unfortunately, Brendan found his way into my bad books by admitting to have lost my ‘dive trowel’. This tool has been great for sediment sampling while diving, as well as shore sampling when not possible to take a spade. Admittedly, the trowel was a cheap plastic one, however the not so cheap brass clip attached to it was another matter!

After the dive, we headed straight off to Walker Creek, which was a 2.5 hour drive south, almost to the opposite end of the island. The shore turned out to be another hard-ish one (photo 2), which was a little disappointing at first, but the collecting turned out to be quite productive. We found some very large orbiniid worms (20-30 cm in length) and an area where there were abundant scaleworms, under more than two thirds of the stones turned over. With the drive back a long and bumpy one, we stopped after an hour so that I could sort through and ‘fix’ (with formaldehyde) the worms and label pots. I have learnt in the past that worms do not enjoy long, bumpy car journeys and break up (particularly more fragile specimens) by the journey end if this is not done.

25.01.15

No shore sampling was planned for today, however, Brendan has managed to get out on 2 different shore dives while I sorted through previous samples, changed formaldehyde to alcohol (a better, less toxic, long term preservative but not as good for the initial fixation) and generally caught up on fieldwork and specimen notes. At lunchtime, the divers returned bearing gifts (even without a trowel). The dive had been on a local Phragmatopoma reef. This is a type of marine bristle worm called a sabellariid (photo 3) that builds hard tubes of sand and can create a reef-like environment around itself. In the UK, other worms of the same family create reefs both on and offshore and are known as ‘honeycomb worms’ due to the appearance of the reef they create. Many other species often inhabit these reefs as well. I was presented with some examples of the reef, some scrapings from rocks and a very large, green paddleworm (photo 4: Eulalia magalhaensis) over 20 cm in length. Another two species of paddleworm, not yet identified, were also found within the samples. These often-colourful worms are very photogenic and I managed to get some good photos of these as well (photos 5 & 6). All in all, a successful day, even without any shore sampling. Loss of the trowel was forgiven!

Sea Lions, Penguins and Algae

Teresa Darbyshire, 23 Ionawr 2015

22.01.15

Bleaker Island has proven to be very interesting and we’ve certainly had the weather to appreciate it, summer has suddenly landed. It’s sunny enough for sun cream but not quite warm enough to tempt us into short sleeves, still that’s a definite improvement!

Bleaker Island is 10-12 miles in length. We’ve been able to use a car whilst here, so have been able to cover most of the island to check out the coastline. We didn’t arrive until mid-afternoon but were just in time yesterday to catch enough of the tide to still be able to do sampling in the mid-shore of the bay just below the settlement (photo 1). This was a soft muddy coarse sand, fairly black in appearance but with several tubes apparent that could contain worms as well as a few other free-living specimens to collect. There were also a few rocks to turn over and inspect. However, the tide was chasing us back up the beach so we did not stay long. Further round from here, the shore was covered in both large and small flat rocks under which we found a few more species to add to the collection.

Once the tide had risen too far to make further collecting worthwhile, we went on our first reccy along the shoreline to see what it looked like. There seemed to be very little in the way of sand except for a very large white sandy bay covered in penguins (photo 2). Sadly, I know from previous experience that worms and penguins don’t mix, with the type of sand favoured by penguins being practically empty of worms. This used up the rest of the usable day but the next day we headed south along the rest of the island. The southern coastline is all exposed cliffs, with large areas of flat rock ledges made up of solid, scoured-clean rock that did not look promising. The northern coastline, more sheltered, had large swathes of different rock ledges that were covered in a filamentous algae that in turn covered large deposits of a pink calcareous, loose alga (photo 3). This was a type of habitat I had not seen around the islands before and was quite excited to find (okay, that may sound strange but we all find different things exciting!). There did not actually seem to be much diversity within the loose crisp algae but at the same time it was a new habitat in a new location and that kind of data is always important to have whether it is rich or poor in animals. After sampling here we still had time to get back to the settlement just at the low tide point. We went back down to the small bay sampled yesterday and added a sample point from low tide to the mid-tide point already surveyed. There was a small distraction in the shape of a mother sea lion and her pup (photo 4), very small being only a couple of weeks old. Distraction over, the sampling was done. Just to finish off the afternoon we drove slightly further up the coast to add another site to the list that also had some of the calcareous algae over rock ledges (photo 5). These were high enough on shore allowing us to sample until 2-3 hours after the tide had turned.

Tomorrow is back to Stanley and we hope summer will come back with us.

‘The Big Garden Birdwatch’

Penny Tomkins, 23 Ionawr 2015

Helo Gyfeillion y Gwanwyn,

Mae yna arolwg gwyddonol cyffrous yn digwydd y penwythnos hwn, ac mae angen eich help chi! ‘The Big Garden Birdwatch’ yw’r enw a’r RSPB - elusen sy’n helpu i edrych ar ôl ein bywyd gwyllt - sy’n trefnu. Gallwch chithau helpu drwy gofrestru ar-lein yma: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birdwatch/. Wedi gwneud hynny, treuliwch awr dros y penwythnos hwn yn cofnodi’r adar sy’n dod i’ch gardd neu lecyn gwyrdd yn agos i’ch cartref. Bydd y pecyn gwybodaeth ar wefan RSPB yn eich helpu i adnabod yr adar! Wedyn, rhowch eich canlyniadau ar wefan RSPB fel eu bod nhw yn gallu eu hychwanegu at yr arolwg mawr cenedlaethol ar boblogaethau adar, sy’n ceisio darganfod mwy am hynt a helynt ein ffrindiau pluog!

Mae’r ‘Big Garden Birdwatch’ wedi bod yn mynd ers 1979! Gallwch ddod o hyd i ganlyniadau blaenorol yma: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birdwatch/previous-results/. Mae arolwg blynyddol a chenedlaethol yn ffordd wych o sylwi ar newidiadau mewn poblogaethau adar. Mae hyn yn bwysig, oherwydd pan fyddwn yn gwybod pa adar sy’n mynd yn brin, gallwn ddod i ddeall pam mae hyn yn digwydd a cheisio helpu’r adar i oroesi. Mae’r ddrudwen yn enghraifft o hyn. Ers i’r ‘Big Garden Birdwatch’ ddechrau yn 1979, mae poblogaeth y ddrudwen wedi lleihau 80%. Mae’r RSPB wedi bod yn codi ymwybyddiaeth o’r pethau y gallwn ni wneud i helpu’r adar hyn, fel torri’r lawnt mewn rhannau o’r ardd er mwyn i’r ddrudwen allu cyrraedd eu bwyd, sef trychfilod a phryfed bach sy’n byw yn y pridd.

Drudwy yn y Gaeaf (llun drwy garedigrwydd wefan yr RSPB).

Dyma rai syniadau ar sut i ddenu adar i’r ardd: http://www.rspb.org.uk/news/387868-top-10-bird-feeding-tips-this-winter. A dyma weithgareddau difyr yn ymwneud ag adar: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birdwatch/family-fun/.

Bydd Sain Ffagan Amgueddfa Werin Cymru ac Amgueddfa Genedlaethol Caerdydd yn cynnal gweithgareddau ‘Big Garden Birdwatch’ y penwythnos hwn! Os ydych chi eisiau ymuno, mae mwy o fanylion yma:

Caerdydd           Sain Ffagan

Diolch yn fawr i bawb wnaeth yrru data tywydd ata i yr wythnos ddiwethaf. Rwy’n edrych ymlaen i weld os yw hi wedi bod yn gynhesach neu’n oerach yr wythnos hon ac os yw hi wedi bwrw eira neu gesair! Cofiwch, os wnewch chi yrru’ch data a gadael i mi wybod ar-lein pan fydd eich planhigion wedi blodeuo, byddwch yn derbyn gwobr Gwyddonydd Gwych a bydd cyfle i chi ennill Taith Natur!
 
Daliwch ati Gyfeillion y Gwanwyn!

Athro’r Ardd

Drudwy (llun o wefan RSPB)

merched y sied

Bernice Parker, 23 Ionawr 2015

Mae’r defaid beichiog yn dod mewn o’r caeau'n syth ar ôl y Nadolig er mwyn cael lloches, bwyd a gofal ychwanegol – sy’n bwysig ar gyfer datblygiad yr wyn. Wnaethon nhw gael eu sganio yn y flwyddyn newydd er mwyn eu gwahanu i ddau grwp: y rhai sydd yn disgwyl oen sengl, a’r lleill sydd yn disgwyl gefeilliad neu dripledi. Mae’r marciau glas ar eu cefnau nhw yn dangos i’r ffermwyr pwy sy’n mynd i gael beth.


Ar hyn o bryd mae gennym tua 100 o ddefaid magu felly dyn ni’n disgwyl 150+ o wyn. Mae ein defaid 2 blwydd oed yn wyna am y tro cyntaf. Mae dafad yn feichiog am 5 mis - mae’n dod i’w thymor ym mis Medi, wedyn mae’r hyrddod yn mynd mewn gyda'r merched ar y cyntaf o Hydref. Felly bydd wyna yn cychwyn dechrau mis Mawrth. Ni sy’n dewis y drefn yma er mwyn cael wyn i'w gweld yng nghaeau'r Amgueddfa dros y Pasg. Dros yr wythnosau nesaf mi fydden nhw’n cicio eu sodlau yn y sied, yn bwyta ac yn cysgu…

Yn torheulo ac yn cael eu maldodi.

Rhywle yn eu phlith nhw mae Poopsie, oen llywaeth o ddwy flynedd yn ol. Mi gafodd yr enw ar ol iddi wneud pw-pw drostai wrth i mi fwydo hi!

Weithiau mae wyn llywaeth yn aros yn ddof ond mae Poopsie wedi ail ymuno a’r ddiadell erbyn hyn. Ond jyst weithiau mae na rhyw edrychiad sy’n dal fy sylw a dwi’n tybio ‘A ti di Poopsie…..?

Foul Bay

Teresa Darbyshire, 21 Ionawr 2015

20.01.15

Well, Foul Bay did live up to its name on what actually turned out to be the best weather we’ve had so far. All of my sampling sites are generally chosen for having easy access off the road, but I had taken a risk this time and picked a site where the road ended before the coast, leaving what I thought would be a reasonably distanced walk. However, as the road finished close to a settlement we stopped in for a quick chat and some advice about access to the shore. The advice was that our chosen route would be unsuitable but there was another track that would get us close a little way back down the road, it was a ‘little soft’ but our 4x4 ‘should’ be fine!

We found the track and made it to the first wire gate (a particular type of access gate here that involves removing part of the fence and then driving through and replacing it). Underneath the wire gate was a very soft, deep-looking area of water (see photo), which with the peaty ground here normally signifies something to be avoided! Looking onwards, the supposedly clear track almost instantly disappeared (to our inexperienced eyes) and therefore we debated the wisdom of continuing. The alternative was to walk to the shore, which appeared to be around 2-3 miles away! As we were on our own and the people from the settlement had driven away, we knew there was no help should problems arise (i.e. getting irretrievably ‘bogged’). We eventually made the difficult decision that this one would have to be cancelled. This left us with a rather disconsolate two hour drive back empty-handed, one to put down to experience unfortunately. A foul day indeed!

Tomorrow we are flying to Bleaker Island, to the southeast of the islands, which fills in a large gap in my coverage around the islands. Fingers crossed that we can find a variety of shores here to cover and improve our record!