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Hydref 2010

Ryseitiau'r Hydref

Postiwyd gan Gareth Bonello ar 28 Hydref 2010
Mae Gwledd yr Hydref yn parhau am un diwrnod arall (fory, dydd gwener yr 29ain). Diolch i bawb a ddaeth i mwynhau'r bwyd yr wythnos yma. Mi fyddaf yn blogio ymhellach am yr Hydref cyn bo hir, ond yn y cyfamser dyma'r ryseitiau fe ddefnyddiom:

Palu yn y pridd

Postiwyd gan Danielle Cowell ar 28 Hydref 2010

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Plannu yn Ysgol Cynfran, Conwy.

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Plannu yn Ysgol Cynfran, Conwy.

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Plannu yn Ysgol Porth Y Felin, Conwy.

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Plannu yn Ysgol Porth Y Felin, Conwy.

Ar dydd Mercher 20 Hydref cafod miloedd o blant hwyl yn palu yn y pridd fel rhan o broject Bylbiau’r Gwanwyn i Ysgolion – ymchwil newid hinsawdd.

Roedd nifer yn edrych ymlaen i blannu’r bylbiau bach y byddant yn gofalu amdanynt tan y gwanwyn nesaf. Yr wythnos nesaf bydd yr ysgolion yn dechrau casglu cofnodion tywydd a chwblhau sialensiau Athro’r Ardd er mwyn ennill eu Tystysgrifau Gwyddonwyr Gwych.

Mae’r project yma yn gyfle gwych i ddysgu y tu allan i’r ystafell ddosbarth, ond mae hefyd yn fodd i Amgueddfa Cymru rannu gwybodaeth ac adnoddau  gwyddonol gydag ysgolion ledled Cymru.

Yr ystadegau...

Mae 5.4% o ysgolion cynradd Cymru yn cymryd rhan eleni, 2,681 o ddisgyblion mewn 71 ysgol ar drws Cymru.

Mae 60% o’r ysgolion dros 30 milltir o Amgueddfa Genedlaethol Caerdydd, sy’n bencadlys yr ymchwiliad. 

Mae 42% o’r ysgolion wedi’u lleoli yng Ngogledd Cymru, 33.8% yn Ne Ddwyrain Cymru, 16.9% yng Ngorllewin Cymru a 8.4% yng Nghanolbarth Cymru.

Mae 38% wedi’u lleoli mewn ardaloedd Cymunedau’n 1af ac mae 40% yn ysgolion Cymraeg neu ddwyieithog.

Mae 37% yn cymryd rhan yn y project am y tro cyntaf tra bo 63% wedi bod yn rhan o’r project am ddwy flynedd neu fwy.

Wales for Africa: crisis

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 25 Hydref 2010

We've convened a crisis meeting of the Forum's members in order to draw up a planned response to the Government's National Development Plan - the Plan with no chapter on housing. Members also looked at the Position Statement I'd drafted the week before, which we're placing in the Times of Zambia - a government paper, so we altered the tone a little bit!

I spent the rest of the week visiting members to carry out the baseline survey. The week was sort of topped and tailed by highlights. At the beginning we visited two women's co-operatives in rural areas, teaching women skills like brick-making and land rights issues. The week ended, however, with a visit I'll never forget. If I said I enjoyed it that would be inappropriate - nobody could enjoy seeing the appalling circumstances some people live in. We visited two compounds, one in Lusaka and one 200 miles north in Kitwe, to conduct focus groups with the residents' committees. In Lusaka, about 2,000 people live in the compound in homes that range from breezeblock constructions to shacks that are collapsing around them. They draw water from shared taps located around the compound. Everywhere is dirt and dust. Some people, usually women, set up their own business, ranging from a single table with a few vegetables to brick-built grocery shops - and loads of hairdressers. I was taken to see the school, which was spotless and being repainted as I was there. A gang of schoolchildren, in their navy blue uniforms, were chatting and giggling on their way from school, just like a crowd of Cardiff schoolkids. Everywhere I went I was followed by a growing crowd of small children. At first they mutter 'muzungu' (white person) but when I wave at them I get dazzling smiles and waves back. And then when I attempt to greet them - 'muli shani' - they burst into laughter.

The residents' committees in both Lusaka and Kitwe are simply inspirational. They're politicised, aware, committed; they spoke in dialect but I continuously heard the words 'advocacy', 'sensitised' and 'empower'. They have the will, the intelligence and the inner resources to achieve what's needed to lift these communities out of abject poverty, if only the infrastructure we take for granted was put in place for them.

Some good news, after our crisis meeting my colleague secured a meeting at the Ministry of Finance the next morning, and a committment to revisit the Housing Chapter to try, with the NGO's help, to make fit for reinstatement in the National Plan. It's a start.

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 16 Hydref 2010

Wales for Africa, now we're communicating

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 14 Hydref 2010

Just met a journalist, who wants to do something with our story about the Government leaving housing out of the National Development Plan (which I still think must be an oversight?!).

He's taken our press release and he loved the open letter, and he's coming back on Saturday to do interviews. Result.

Toddler playtime

Postiwyd gan Sian Lile-Pastore ar 14 Hydref 2010

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Yesterday we had our second toddler session in the gallery. We will be holding the sessions once a month and each month will look at a different theme - this month the theme was Autumn, and the one before looked at farm animals. The sessions are quite informal giving the little ones a chance to play and experience our different activities and to socialise with the other children. Another important part of the session is that it is bilingual, so the staff who are working (Ffion,Iola and myself this month) can speak in Welsh or English to the children, and the songs that Ffion led at the end were also in Welsh. It's a nice way for English speaking parents to begin to learn Welsh with their children.

So, what do we do? yesterday we had an art and craft table where the children could decorate pumpkin shapes or leaves, make leaf rubbings (although I find this is often a bit difficult for the under 3's!) or do some drawing. We also had a sensory tray filled with leaves, plastic bugs, fircones and dried lemon slices; coloured and scented playdough (yellow playdough was vanilla and the orange one cinammon and spices) with different cookie cutter shapes to play with; a sandpit and fircones (the sandpit was going to be our sensory tray and we were going to change it each month, but the children seemed to enjoy playing with the sand so much we didn't have the heart to change it! What I might do though is dye the sand at some point so it will be a little bit more exciting!); soft toys to play with and a quiet area with picture books. The picture books we had yesterday were 'Cwymp y dail' by Sian Lewis which is a Sali Mali book about Autumn, 'Cawl Pwmpen' by Helen Cooper - a nice autumnal book about pumpkin soup, 'Hibernation Station' by Michelle Meadows and Kurt Cyrus - an unbelievably cute story about animals hibernating, although perhaps a little too 'american' for some tastes (not mine!), 'The Tiny Seed' by Eric Carle - i love the illustrations in this, 'I am a Bunny' by Ole Risom and Richard Scarry - an adorable simple book about the seasons, and my find of the month, 'Autumn' by Gerda Muller - this was perfect for a bilingual session as it doesn't have any words (I didn't realise this when I ordered it) and consists of illustrations of the type of things that happen in the autumn - leaves falling off the trees, rainy weather, making leaf rubbings, making jam and hibernating animals. It's a lovely book to look through with a child as it lets them make up the story themselves.

We ended the session with a song about Autumn, and sent them all off with a leaf bag and a leaf spotting sheet in case they wanted to have a walk around the museum.

Next month our theme is buildings

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Wales for Africa

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 14 Hydref 2010

Finally, finally feel like I've started work. I've spent hours in the back of a very hot car driving around a gridlocked Lusaka, a crash course (nearly literally) in NGO culture. But met some amazing people along the way though.

I wrote a press release and was very excited when the comms person from the organization we share offices with told me he'd take it to the journalist he was meeting that evening. Unfortunately, i hadn't counted for the dire network connection in our offices and lack of networked printer, so I couldn't get the press release to him, by hard copy or email. Not so exciting.

Then wrote a letter to the Minister for Finance and National Planning, an open letter we're placing in The Post and a letter to housing stakeholders inlcuding the World Bank. All part of our preparation for a crisis meeting. The Zambian government has published their Sixth National Development Plan, but left out the chapter on housing - madness if they want to deliver on their other priorities like health and education.

The Post is the paper with highest circulation figures, and very much holds the government to account. Unlike UK high-circulatin 'newspapers', The Post is crammed with political items, including a substantial international section. Not a celebrity in sight. How refreshing.

I think I'll be doing a lot of responsive stuff like this, as well as working on the longer-term strategy, but it's all useful as we talk a lot about voice, audience and tools.        

Wales for Africa - to work

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 13 Hydref 2010

Spent a packed day meeting, greeting, listening to some pretty amazing people. I’ve already got a much better picture of who does what, who funds what and why. The NGO sector is huge in Africa, and for the most part it deals directly with civic and community organizations, but at some points, for example the Civic Forum on Housing & Habitat, where I am, it has to deal with the government in a lobbying and advocacy role. Interesting, as the Forum is funded by the Swedish Cooperative Centre, which is itself funded by the Swedish Government.

Some things are surprisingly familiar - there are issues that the Zambian Government wants organizations to mainstream: sustainability is a familiar one; gender, perhaps; but HIV/Aids is a well established agenda here, and anti-fraud and corruption is actively being promoted now (I should know, I had to sit through the meeting!)

Wales for Africa - touchdown

Postiwyd gan Mari Gordon ar 13 Hydref 2010

First impressions:

Zambia is very flat, so the horizon all around is low. Even at 6am it’s about 17°C and we’re warm and sticky. Driving from the airport towards Lusaka, it could pass for a southern European hot dry country - blue sky, yellow earth, palm trees. Except there's a burnt, nutty smell hanging on the air, making my nose tickle. The roads are pretty good, straight and smooth. It’s early and there’s not so much traffic, but we pass loads of cyclists, making a laboured journey towards town with their bikes laden with parcels wrapped in various materials, mostly straw, built up in a well-balanced if precarious heap up the back of the bike.

When I got in the back of the car I automatically went to put on my seatbelt and, struggling a bit, asked where the buckle was only to be told with a smile that it was ok. I wondered what was ok, then realised that he was telling me it was ok not to wear a seat belt. Then I noticed that both men in the front weren’t wearing seatbelts either.

I later learnt that the smoky smell is charcoal burning, and many of those brave cyclists we passed were carrying bundles of it to sell by the roadsides in Lusaka.

October in Oriel 1

Postiwyd gan Sian Lile-Pastore ar 6 Hydref 2010

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There are lots of things happening in the gallery this month. There's the Keepsakes Project Workshop this saturday, and curator of costumes and textiles, Elen Phillips will also be giving behind the scenes tours of the Museum stores. It is essential that you book in advance for the tours (which will also be held the week after on the 16th too) as spaces are limited.

This months Playtime session for toddlers is now fully booked, so make sure you book early for the next ones!

As usual, the art cart will be in the gallery during October half term. From Saturday 23 until Friday 29 of October we will be making things to do with Keepsakes to tie in with the exhibiton, and then on the 30th and 31st we will be making something spooky for Halloween.